How To Add a Virtual Serial Port to a Virtual Machine

You can add up to four serial (COM) ports to a virtual machine. Virtual serial ports can output to physical serial ports, files, or named pipes.

You might want to add a virtual serial port to a virtual machine to make devices such as modems and printers available to the virtual machine. You can also use virtual ports to send debugging data from a virtual machine to the host system or to another virtual machine.

NOTE: The virtual printer feature configures a serial port to make host printers available to the guest. You do not need to install additional drivers in the virtual machine.

Prerequisites 

- Power off the virtual machine.

Procedure

1. Select the virtual machine and select VM > Settings.

2. On the Hardware tab, click Add.

3. In the Add Hardware wizard, select Serial Port.

4. Select where the virtual serial parallel port sends output.


Option
Description
Use a physical parallel port Send output to a physical serial port on the host system.
Use output file Send output to a file on the host system. Either locate an existing output file
or browse to a directory and type a filename to create a new output file.
Output to named pipe Set up a direct connection between two virtual machines, or a connection
between a virtual machine and an application on the host system.


5. If you selected Output to named pipe, configure the named pipe.
    a) (Windows host) Use the default pipe name, or type another pipe name.
        The pipe name must begin with \\.\pipe\ and must be the same on both the server and the client. For example: \\.\pipe\namedpipe
    b)  (Linux host) Type /tmp/socket or another UNIX socket name in the first text box.
        The pipe name must be the same on both the server and the client.
   c)  To send debugging information to an application on the host system, select This end is the server from the first drop-down menu and select The other end is an application from the second dropdown menu.
   d) To send debugging information to another virtual machine, select This end is the server from the first drop-down menu and The other end is a virtual machine from the second drop-down menu.
6. To connect the port to the virtual machine when the virtual machine powers on, select Connect at power on.
7. Click Finish to add the virtual serial port to the virtual machine.

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How to Change the Input Speed of a Serial Connection in VMware Workstation

You can increase the speed of a serial connection over a pipe to a virtual machine. 

In principle, the output speed, which is the speed at which the virtual machine sends data through the virtual serial port, is unlimited. In practice, the output speed depends on how fast the application at the other end of the pipe reads inbound data.

Serial Connection in VMware Workstation

Prerequisites

  • Use the guest operating system to configure the serial port for the highest setting supported by the application that you are running in the virtual machine. 
  • Power off the virtual machine and exit Workstation.

Procedure

1. In a text editor, add the following line to the virtual machine configuration (.vmx) file. 

serialport_number.pipe.charTimePercent = "time" 

port_number is the number of the serial port, starting from 0. The first serial port is serial0. time is a positive integer that specifies the time taken to transmit a character, expressed as a percentage of the default speed set for the serial port in the guest operating system. For example, a setting of 200 forces the port to take twice as long for each character, or send data at half the default speed. A setting of 50 forces the port to take only half as long for each character, or send data at twice the default speed. 

2. Assuming that the serial port speed is set appropriately in the guest operating system, experiment with this setting by starting with a value of 100 and gradually decreasing it until you find the highest speed at which the connection works reliably.
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Configuring Power Options and Power Control Settings in VMware Workstation

You can configure how a virtual machine behaves when it is powered on, powered off, and closed. You can also configure the behavior of the power controls and specify which power options appear in the context menu when you right-click the virtual machine in the library.

VMware workstation

You can configure a soft or hard setting for each power control. A soft setting sends a request to the guest operating system, which the guest operating system can ignore or, in the case of a deadlocked guest, it might not be able to handle. A guest operating system cannot ignore a hard power control. Hard power control settings are configured by default.

 

Power control settings affect the behavior of the stop, suspend, start, and reset buttons. The behavior you select for a power control appears in a tooltip when you mouse over the button. Power control settings also determine which power options appear in the context menu. For example, if you select the hard setting for the start control,

 

Power On appears in the context menu when you right-click the virtual machine in the library. If you select the soft setting, Start Up Guest appears instead.

 

Not all guest operating systems respond to a shutdown or restart signal. If the guest operating system does not respond to the signal, shut down or restart from within the guest operating system.

 

You can pass X toolkit options when you power on a virtual machine for a Linux guest operating system.

Procedure

1 Select the virtual machine and select VM > Settings.
2 On the Options tab, select Power.
3 Select a power option.

Enter full screen mode after powering on- The virtual machine enters full screen mode after it is powered on.

Close after powering off or suspending- The virtual machine closes after it is powered off or suspended.

Report battery information to guest- Battery information is reported to the guest operating system. If you run the virtual machine on a laptop in full screen mode, this option enables you to determine when the battery is running low. This option is available only for Workstation 6.x and later virtual machines.

4 Select a setting for the power off control.

Power Off-  (Hard option) Workstation powers off the virtual machine abruptly with no consideration for work in progress.

Shut Down Guest-  (Soft option) Workstation sends a shut down signal to the guest operating system. An operating system that recognizes the signal shuts down gracefully. Not all guest operating systems respond to a shutdown signal from Workstation. If the guest operating system does not respond to the signal, shut down from the guest operating system as you would a physical machine.

5 Select a setting for the suspend control.

Suspend-  (Hard option) Workstation suspends the virtual machine and leaves it connected to the network.

Suspend Guest- (Soft option) Workstation suspends the virtual machine and disconnects it from the network. VMware Tools runs a script in the guest operating system. On Windows guests, if the virtual machine is configured to use DHCP, the script releases the IP address of the virtual machine. On Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris guests, the script stops networking for the virtual machine.

6 Select a setting for the start control.

Power On- (Hard option) Workstation starts the virtual machine.

Start Up Guest-  (Soft option) Workstation starts the virtual machine and VMware Tools runs a script in the guest operating system. On Windows guests, if the virtual machine is configured to use DHCP, the script renews the IP address of the virtual machine. On a Linux, FreeBSD, or Solaris guest, the script starts networking for the virtual machine.

7 Select a setting for the reset control.

Reset-  (Hard option) Workstation resets the virtual machine abruptly with no consideration for work in progress.

Restart Guest- (Soft option) Workstation shuts down and restarts the guest operating system gracefully. VMware Tools runs scripts before the virtual machine shuts down and when the virtual machine starts up.

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Using Advanced Linux Sound Architecture(ALSA) in VMware Workstation

Workstation 7.x and later versions support Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA). You might need to perform certain preparation tasks before you can use ALSA in a virtual machine.

 

ALSA in VMware workstation

To use ALSA, the host system must meet certain requirements.
+ The ALSA library version on the host system must be version 1.0.16 or later.
+  The sound card on the host system must support ALSA. The ALSA project Web site maintains a current listing of sound cards and chipsets that support ALSA.
+ The ALSA sound card on the host system must not be muted.
+ The current user must have the appropriate permissions to use the ALSA sound card.

Override the ALSA Library Version Requirement for a Virtual Machine

If the host system has an earlier version of the ALSA library, you can override the requirement for version 1.0.16.

If the host system does not meet ALSA requirements, or for some other reason cannot use ALSA, Workstation uses the OSS API for sound playback and recording. Depending on the sound card in the host system, the sound quality might not be as good when an older version of the ALSA library is used.

 

You should upgrade the host system to use the latest sound drivers and libraries.

 

Procedure

1 Open the virtual machine configuration (.vmx) file in a text editor.
2 Add the sound.skipAlsaVersionCheck property and set it to TRUE.
For example: sound.skipAlsaVersionCheck = "TRUE".

Obtain ALSA Sound Card Information

You can type commands at the command prompt on a Linux host system to obtain information about the ALSA sound card and determine whether the current user has the appropriate permissions to access it.

 

Prerequisites

Obtain the documentation for the alsamixer program. The documentation is available on the Internet.

 

Procedure

+ Use the alsamixer program to determine whether the current user has the appropriate permissions to access the ALSA sound card.

 

If the user does not have the appropriate permissions, an error similar to alsamixer: function snd_ctl_open failed for default: No such device. appears.

 

+ If a user does not have the appropriate permissions to access the ALSA sound card, give the user read, write, and execute permissions to the directory that contains the ALSA sound card.

 

The ALSA sound card is usually located in /dev/snd/. This location can vary depending on the Linux distribution.

 

+ To list the name and type of sound chipset on the host system, type the command lspci | grep –I audio.

 

+ To list the sound cards on the host system, type the command cat /proc/asound/cards.

 

+ If the ALSA sound card is muted, use the alsamixer program to unmute it.

Configure a Virtual Machine to Use an ALSA Sound Card

You can configure a virtual machine to use an ALSA sound card by modifying virtual machine settings.

 

Procedure

1 Select the virtual machine and select VM > Settings.
2 On the Hardware tab, select Sound Card.
3 Select Connected and Connect at power on.
4 Select Specify host sound card and select the ALSA sound card.
5 If the ALSA sound card does not appear in the list, use the alsa-utils package to list the ALSA sound cards on the host system and select Specify host sound card again.

For example: aplay -L
6 Click OK to save your changes.

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Understanding Virtual Networking Components of VMware Workstation

The virtual networking components in Workstation include virtual switches, virtual network adapters, the virtual DHCP server, and the NAT device.

 

Virtual Switches

Like a physical switch, a virtual switch connects networking components together. Virtual switches, which are also referred to as virtual networks, are named VMnet0, VMnet1, VMnet2, and so on. A few virtual switches are mapped to specific networks by default.

 

Network Type

Switch Name

Bridged

VMnet0

NAT

VMnet8

Host-only

VMnet1

 

Workstation creates virtual switches as needed, up to 10 virtual switches on a Windows host system and up to 255 virtual switches on a Linux host system. You can connect an unlimited number of virtual network devices to a virtual switch on a Windows host system and up to 32 virtual network devices to a virtual switch on a Linux host system.

 

Virtual Network Adapters

When you use the New Virtual Machine wizard to create a new virtual machine, the wizard creates a virtual network adapter for the virtual machine. The virtual network adapter appears in the guest operating system as an AMD PCNET PCI adapter or Intel Pro/1000 MT Server Adapter. In Windows Vista and Windows 7 guest operating systems, it is an Intel Pro/1000 MT Server Adapter.

 

Workstation 6.0 and later virtual machines can have up to 10 virtual network adapters. Workstation 4 or 5.x virtual machines are limited to three virtual network adapters.

 

Virtual DHCP Server

The virtual Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server provides IP addresses to virtual machines in configurations that are not bridged to an external network. For example, the virtual DHCP server assigns IP addresses to virtual machines in host-only and NAT configurations.

 

NAT Device

In a NAT configuration, the NAT device passes network data between one or more virtual machines and the external network, identifies incoming data packets intended for each virtual machine, and sends them to the correct destination.

 

Understanding Common Networking Configurations

You can configure bridged networking, NAT, and host-only networking for virtual machines. You can also use the virtual networking components to create sophisticated custom virtual networks.

 

Bridged Networking

Bridged networking connects a virtual machine to a network by using the network adapter on the host system. If the host system is on a network, bridged networking is often the easiest way to give the virtual machine access to that network.

 

When you install Workstation on a Windows or Linux host system, a bridged network (VMnet0) is set up for you.

 

NAT Networking

With NAT, a virtual machine does not have its own IP address on the external network. Instead, a separate private network is set up on the host system. In the default configuration, a virtual machine gets an address on this private network from the virtual DHCP server. The virtual machine and the host system share a single network identity that is not visible on the external network.

 

When you install Workstation on a Windows or Linux host system, a NAT network (VMnet8) is set up for you. When you use the New Virtual Machine wizard to create a new virtual machine and select the typical configuration type, the wizard configures the virtual machine to use the default NAT network.

 

You can have only one NAT network.

 

Host-Only Networking

Host-only networking creates a network that is completely contained within the host computer. Host-only networking provides a network connection between the virtual machine and the host system by using a virtual network adapter that is visible on the host operating system.

 

When you install Workstation on a Windows or Linux host system, a host-only network (VMnet1) is set up
for you.

 

Custom Networking Configurations

With the Workstation virtual networking components, you can create sophisticated virtual networks. The virtual networks can be connected to one or more external networks, or they can run entirely on the host system. You can use the virtual network editor to configure multiple network cards in the host system and create multiple virtual networks.

 

Also Read The requirements of a host system in virtualization

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Preparing to Create a New Virtual Machine in VMware Workstation

You use the New Virtual Machine wizard to create a new virtual machine in Workstation. The wizard prompts you to make decisions about many aspects of the virtual machine. You should make these decisions before you start the New Virtual Machine wizard.

Selecting a Virtual Machine Configuration

When you start the New Virtual Machine wizard, the wizard prompts you to select a typical or custom configuration.
Typical Configuration If you select a typical configuration, you must specify or accept defaults for a few basic virtual machine settings.
+ How you want to install the guest operating system.
+ A name for the virtual machine and a location for the virtual machine files.
+ The size of the virtual disk and whether to split the disk into multiple virtual disk files.
+ Whether to customize specific hardware settings, including memory allocation, number of virtual processors, and network connection type.

Custom Configuration

You must select a custom configuration if you need to perform any of the following hardware customizations.
+ Create a virtual machine that has a different Workstation version than the default hardware compatibility setting.
+ Select the I/O controller type for the SCSI controller.
+ Select the virtual disk device type.
+ Configure a physical disk or an existing virtual disk instead of create a new virtual disk.
+ Allocate all virtual disk space rather than let disk space gradually grow to the maximum disk size.

Selecting the Virtual Machine Hardware Compatibility Setting

All virtual machines have a hardware version. The hardware version indicates which virtual hardware features that the virtual machine supports, such as BIOS or EFI, number of virtual slots, maximum number of CPUs, maximum memory configuration, and other hardware characteristics. The virtual machine hardware compatibility setting determines the hardware features of the virtual machine.

If you select a typical configuration, the wizard uses the default hardware compatibility setting configured in the Workstation preferences. By default, the default hardware compatibility setting is the installed Workstation version.

If you select a custom configuration, the New Virtual Machine wizard prompts you to select a hardware compatibility setting for the virtual machine. When you select a hardware compatibility setting, a list of the VMware products and versions that are compatible with your selection appears. Limitations and features that are not available for your selection are also listed. If a feature compatibility check box is available for your selection, you can select that check box to see a list of the additional limitations.

To deploy virtual machines to run on a different VMware product, you might need to select a hardware compatibility setting that is compatible with that product.

Selecting a Guest Operating System

The New Virtual Machine prompts you to select the source media for the operating system that will run inside the virtual machine. You can specify an installer disc inserted in a physical drive, an ISO image file, or you can instruct the New Virtual Machine wizard to create a virtual machine that has a blank hard disk.

If you select an installer disc or an ISO image file and the operating system supports Easy Install, the guest operating system installation is automated and VMware Tools is installed. If the installer disc or ISO image file contains a product key number and is already set up to perform an unattended installation, the only benefit of using Easy Install is the automatic installation of VMware Tools.

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Requirements of the Host System in Virtualization(VMware workstation)

Like physical computers, the virtual machines running under Workstation perform better if they have faster processors and more memory.

 

VMware requirements

Hardware Requirements

- Standard x86‐compatible or x86‐64‐compatible personal computer- 733MHz or faster CPU minimum Compatible processors include:
   - Intel: Celeron, Pentium II, Pentium III, Pentium 4, Pentium M (including computers with Centrino mobile technology), Xeon (including “Prestonia”), and Core 2 processors
   - AMD: Athlon, Athlon MP, Athlon XP, Athlon 64, Duron, Opteron, Turion 64
   - AMD Sempron

 

For additional information, including notes on processors that are not compatible, see the VMware knowledge base at www.vmware.com/support/kb/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=967.

 

- Multiprocessor systems supported
- 64‐bit systems supported: AMD Opteron, AMD Athlon 64, AMD Turion 64, AMD Sempron, Intel EM64T. Support for 64‐bit guest operating systems is available only on the following versions of these processors:
   - AMD Athlon 64, revision D or later
   - AMD Opteron, revision E or later
   - AMD Turion 64, revision E or later
   - AMD Sempron, 64‐bit‐capable revision D or later
   - Intel Pentium 4 and Core 2 processors with EM64T and Intel Virtualization Technology.

 

Memory Requirements

512MB minimum (2GB is recommended).
You must have enough memory to run the host operating system, plus the memory required for each guest operating system and for applications on the host and guest. See your guest operating system and application documentation for their memory requirements.

 

As of version 6.0 or later of Workstation, the total amount of memory you can assign to all virtual machines running on a single host is unlimited. The maximum amount of memory per virtual machine is 8GB.

 

Display

16‐bit or 32‐bit display adapter is recommended.

 

Disk Drives

Guest operating systems can reside on physical disk partitions or in virtual disk files.

 

Hard Disk

- IDE and SCSI hard drives supported.
- At least 1GB free disk space recommended for each guest operating system and the application software used with it. If you use a default setup, the actual disk space needs are approximately the same as those for installing and running the guest operating system and applications on a physical computer.
- For installation – 200MB (Linux) or 900MB (Windows) free disk space required for basic installation. You can delete the installer afterwards to reclaim disk space.

 

Optical CD-ROM/DVD-ROM Drive

- IDE and SCSI optical drives supported.
- CD‐ROM and DVD‐ROM drives supported.
- ISO disk image files supported.

 

Floppy Drives

Virtual machines can connect to the host’s floppy drives. Floppy disk image files are also supported.

 

Local Area Networking (Optional)

- Any Ethernet controller supported by the host operating system.
- Non‐Ethernet networks supported using built‐in network address translation (NAT) or using a combination of host‐only networking plus routing software on the host operating system.

 

Host Operating System

VMware Workstation is available for both Windows and Linux host operating systems.

 

Windows Host Operating Systems (32-Bit)

Workstation supports the following Windows 32‐bit host operating systems:
- Windows Vista Enterprise Edition
  Windows Vista Business Edition
  Windows Vista Home Basic and Premium Editions
  Windows Vista Ultimate Edition
- Windows Server 2008, SP1
- Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition, SP1, SP2
  Windows Server 2003 Web Edition, SP1
  Windows Server 2003 Small Business Edition, SP1, SP2
  Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition, SP1, SP2
  Windows Server 2003 R2
(Listed versions are also supported with no service pack.)
- Windows XP Home Edition, SP1, SP2
  Windows XP Professional, SP1, SP2
- Windows 2000 Server SP3, SP4
  Windows 2000 Professional, SP3, SP4
  Windows 2000 Advanced Server, SP3, SP4

 

Windows Host Operating Systems (64-Bit)

- Windows Vista Enterprise Edition
  Windows Vista Business Edition
  Windows Vista Home Basic and Premium Editions
  Windows Vista Ultimate Edition
- Windows Server 2008 x64 Edition SP1
- Windows Server 2003 x64 Edition SP1
  Windows Server 2003 x64 Edition R2
- Windows XP Professional x64 Edition
A Web browser is required for the Help system.

 

Linux Host Operating Systems (32-Bit)

Supported distributions and kernels are listed below. Workstation might not run on systems that do not meet these requirements.

Note: As newer Linux kernels and distributions are released, VMware modifies and tests its products for stability and reliability on those host platforms. VMware makes every effort to add support for new kernels and distributions in a timely manner, but until a kernel or distribution is added to the list below, its use with VMware products is not supported. Look for newer prebuilt modules in the download area of the VMware Web site. Go to www.vmware.com/download/.

- Mandriva Linux 2006 and 2007
  Mandriva Corporate Desktop 4.0
  Mandriva Corporate Server 4.0
  Mandrake Linux 10.1
  Mandrake Linux 9.0 — stock 2.4.19
- Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.0
  Red Hat Enterprise Linux WS 4.5 (formerly called 4.0 Update 5)
  Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS 4.0, updates 1, 2, 3, 4
  Red Hat Enterprise Linux ES 4.0, updates 1, 2, 3, 4
  Red Hat Enterprise Linux WS 4.0, updates 1, 2, 3, 4
  Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS 3.0, updates 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
  Red Hat Enterprise Linux ES 3.0, updates 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
  Red Hat Enterprise Linux WS 3.0, updates 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

  Red Hat Enterprise Linux 2.1 — stock 2.4.9‐e3
  Red Hat Linux 9.0 — stock 2.4.20‐8, upgrade 2.4.20‐20.9
  Red Hat Linux 8.0 — stock 2.4.18
  Red Hat Linux 7.3 — stock 2.4.18
  Red Hat Linux 7.2 — stock 2.4.7‐10, upgrade 2.4.9‐7, upgrade 2.4.9‐13, upgrade 2.4.9‐21, upgrade 2.4.9‐31
  Red Hat Linux 7.1 — stock 2.4.2‐2, upgrade 2.4.3‐12
  Red Hat Linux 7.0 — stock 2.2.16‐22, upgrade 2.2.17‐14

 

- SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 SP1
  SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9 SP4
  SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9, 9 SP1, 9 SP2, 9 SP3
  (Listed versions are also supported with no service pack.)
  SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 8, stock 2.4.19
  openSUSE 10.3
  openSUSE 10.2 (formerly known as SUSE Linux 10.2)
  SUSE Linux 10.1
  SUSE Linux 10
  SUSE Linux 9.3
  SUSE Linux 9.2, SP1)
  SUSE Linux 9.1 — stock 2.6.4‐52
  SUSE Linux 9.0 — stock 2.4.21‐99
  SUSE Linux 8.2 — stock 2.4.20

 

- Ubuntu Linux 7.04
  Ubuntu Linux 6.10
  Ubuntu Linux 6.06
  Ubuntu Linux 5.10
  Ubuntu Linux 5.04
A Web browser is required for the Help system.

 

Linux Host Operating Systems (64-Bit)

Supported distributions and kernels are listed below. Workstation might not run on systems that do not meet these requirements.

NOTE: As newer Linux kernels and distributions are released, VMware modifies and tests its products for stability and reliability on those host platforms. VMware makes every effort to add support for new kernels and distributions in a timely manner, but until a kernel or distribution is added to the list below, its use with VMware productsis not supported. Look for newer prebuilt modules in the download area of theVMware Web site. Go to www.vmware.com/download/.

- Mandriva Linux 2006 and 2007
  Mandriva Corporate Desktop 4.0
  Mandriva Corporate Server 4.0

 

Important: On 64‐bit Mandriva hosts, some 32‐bit compatibility libraries are required. Specifically, 32‐bit glibc, X11, and libXtst.so are required.

 

- Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.0
  Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4.5 (formerly called 4.0 Update 5)
  Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS 4.0, updates 3, 4
  Red Hat Enterprise Linux ES 4.0, updates 3, 4
  Red Hat Enterprise Linux WS 4.0, updates 3, 4
  Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS 3.0, stock 2.4.21, updates 2.4.21‐15, 6, 7, 8
  Red Hat Enterprise Linux ES 3.0, stock 2.4.21, updates 2.4.21‐15, 6, 7, 8
  Red Hat Enterprise Linux WS 3.0, stock 2.4.21, updates 2.4.21‐15, 6, 7, 8

 

- SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 SP1
  SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9 SP4
  SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9, SP1, SP2, SP3
  (Listed versions are also supported with no service pack.)
  openSUSE 10.3
  openSUSE 10.2 (formerly known as SUSE Linux 10.2)
  SUSE Linux 10.1
  SUSE Linux 10
  SUSE Linux 9.3
  SUSE Linux 9.2, SP1
  SUSE Linux 9.1 — stock 2.6.4‐52

 

- Ubuntu Linux 7.04
  Ubuntu Linux 6.10
  Ubuntu Linux 6.06
  Ubuntu Linux 5.10
  Ubuntu Linux 5.04

 

Important: On 64‐bit Ubuntu 6.x hosts, some 32‐bit compatibility libraries are required. Specifically, 32‐bit glibc and X11 are required.

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Check these before installing VMware Workstation

Installing VMware Workstation is usually a simple process of running a standard installation wizard. This article outlines the tasks you need to perform before starting an installation, and it contains an important note about the compatibility of having multiple VMware products installed on the same computer as Workstation. Before you begin installation, be sure you have:

Before Installing the VMware 
Compatible host – Verify that the computer and host operating system meet the system requirements for running Workstation

Workstation installation software – If you bought the packaged distribution of Workstation, the installation software is on the CD in your package. If you bought the electronic distribution, the installation software is in the file you downloaded.

VMware Workstation is available for both Windows and Linux host computers. The installation files for both host platforms are included on the same CD‐ROM.

Workstation serial number – Your serial number is on the registration card in your package. If you purchased Workstation online, the serial number is sent by email.

Your serial number allows you to use Workstation only on the host operating system for which you licensed the software. For example, if you have a serial number for a Windows host, you cannot run the software on a Linux host. Make sure you enter the serial number for the correct operating system.

To use Workstation on a different host operating system, purchase a license on the VMware Web site. You can also get an evaluation license at no charge for a 30‐day evaluation of the software. For more information, go to www.vmware.com/download/.

A guest operating system – After Workstation is installed, you will need the operating system installation CDs or OS images to set up your guest.
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